Cold War and the US



Course information

Title

Cold War and the US

Lecturer

Cora Zoltán

Course code

YSE_BTK011

Credit

3

Location

-

Time

-

Course description

Short description

The course offers a critical examination of the major phases of the Cold War from a historical perspective, focusing on the diplomatic relations of the superpowers. On the one hand, the students familiarise with the participation of the USA in this ensuing post-war superpower enmity. The question is raised how the US was involved in the economic and political integration of Western European countries as well. On the other hand, the seminar elaborates on themes of post-war international politics, including the discussion of, for example, the missile crisis in Cuba, superpower relations in the 1970s-1980s, or the so-called ’The West and the Rest’ debate. Participants are also invited to apply the theoretical and historical knowledge gained through the course in their chosen presentations. The course also seeks to familiarise students with major historical problems throughout the period by interpreting relevant primary (diaries, newspapers, legal texts, speeches, etc.) and secondary sources (relevant literature).

Schedule

0. Myths and realities: the new world order after the war (including the historiography of the Cold War): introductory lecture

1. After World War II: the origins of the cold war

Core readings: Winkler, 6-17. p.; Blakeley, 244-246. p. The Atlantic Charter (1941). The role of the United States; Presentation / suggested: Gaddis, Kissinger, relevant parts.

2. The incubator phase of Cold War (1945-1946) I:repolarising the world, cooperation and confrontation

Core readings: Winkler, 17-26. p.; Presentation / suggested: Lukacs, John: Through the History of the Cold War: the Correspondence of George F. Kennan and John Lukacs.; Cora (2014)

3. The Truman Doctrine and its context (1947-1949): confrontation becoming official

Core readings: Winkler, 26-32. p.; Presentation / suggested: Magyarics, Gaddis, relevant parts.

4. The Marshall Plan, European integration and the Cold War

Core readings: Winkler, 32-38. p.; Presentation / suggested: Losoncz Miklós: “A Marshall-terv.” Rubikon, 2002, 9-10., 28-31.; Borhi László: “Az Európa-gondolat és a hidegháború.” Rubikon, 1991, 9., 14-17.

5. The Korean War (1950-1953) and diplomatic relations in the early 1950s

Core readings: Winkler, 38-44. p.; Presentation / suggested: Gaddis, 107-159.

6. “The Anti-Communist Crusade” in the US in the 1950s

Core reading: Winkler, 45-70. p.

7. The Suez Crisis and its aftermath, the Hungarian Revolution of 1956 and the US

Core readings: Winkler, 71- 85. p.; Blakeley, 255-257. p. (Anthony Eden, Speech on BBC (1956). The Suez Crisis); Presentation / suggested: Kissinger, 509-539.; Békés Csaba: Az 1956-os magyar forradalom a világpolitikában. Bp., 1956-os Intézet, 1996, 13-87.

8. The Missile Crisis in Cuba: possibilites and limitations of détente in the 1960s

Core reading: Winkler, 85-107. p.; Presentation / suggested: John F. Kennedy és Nyikita Hruscsov levelezése a kubai rakétaválság alatt. Transl. and ed. by Simon Ágnes and Simon Eszter. Dokumenta Historica 55. Szeged, 2002, 13-78.

9. War in Vietnam

Core reading: Winkler, 107-131. p.; Presentation / suggested: Magyarics, 411-443.; Kissinger, 615-700.; Gy. Horváth László: Amerika és a “Vietnám experience”. Nagyvilág, 1995, 5-6. sz.

10. The globalisation of superpowers’ role in world politics in the 1970s-1980s

Core reading: Winkler, 132-143. p.; Presentation / suggested: Kissinger, 732-761.; Magyarics, 547-576.; Horváth Gábor: “A feltartóztatási politika az Egyesült Államok kül- és nemzetbiztonsági politikájában (1961-1997).” Külpolitika, (új folyam), 1997, 3. sz., 18-48.

11. The End of the Cold War: the collapse of the bipolar world order

Core reading: Winkler, 143-147. p.; Presentation / suggested: Kissinger, 762-838.; Eric J. Hobsbawm: The Age of Extremes. The Short Twentieth Century 1914-1991. London: Abacus, 1994, 558-585.

12. The new global order and unipolarisation

Core readings: Chan, Stephen: “After The Order of Civilisation. Weightless International Relations and the Burden of Unreduced Responsibility”, in: Interventions. 10:2 (2008), 236-248.; Gowan, Peter: “Cooperation and Conflict in Transatlantic Relations after the Cold War”, in: Interventions. 5:2 (2003) 218-232.; Sassen, Saskia: “The State of Globalisation”, in: Interventions. 5:2 (2003), 241-248.; Smith, Neil: “After the American Lebensraum: Empire, Empire and Globalisation”, in: Interventions. 5:2 (2003), 249-270.); Suggested: Magyarics, 579-680.

12. End Term Test

 

Semester

Fall 2018

Requirements

Requirements to get the grade

Assessment: student’s participation in discussions and debates of the classes (30%), presentation and the quality of the handout or providing a book review (30%), end term test (40%).

Reading list

Handbooks and textbooks for all topics (these works can be used for all topics, even if not indicated specifically) and articles:

Blakeley, Brian – Collins, Jacquelin: Documents in British History. Vol. II: 1688 to Present. London: McGraw-Hill Inc., 1993. (textbook, relevant parts)

Chan, Stephen: “After The Order of Civilisation. Weightless International Relations and the Burden of Unreduced Responsibility”, in: Interventions. 10:2 (2008), 236-248.

Fischer Ferenc: A megosztott világ. A Kelet-Nyugat, Észak-Dél nemzetközi kapcsolatok fő vonásai (1945-1989). Budapest: IKVA, 1992. (and newer editions, relevant parts)

Gaddis, John Lewis: We Now Know: Rethinking Cold War History. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1997. [Most már tudjuk. A hidegháború történetének újraértékelése. Ford. Kovács Attila. Budapest: Európa, 2001.]

Gowan, Peter: “Cooperation and Conflict in Transatlantic Relations after the Cold War”, in: Interventions. 5:2 (2003) 218-232.

Kissinger, Henry: Diplomacy. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1994.[Diplomácia. Budapest: Panem-Grafo, 1998.]

MacMahon, Robert: The Cold War. A Very Short Introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003.

Magyarics Tamás: Az Egyesült Államok külpolitikájának története. Mítosz és valóság: érdekek és értékek. Budapest: Antall József Tudásközpont, 2014.

Mezei Géza (szerk.): Európa kettészakítása és a kétpólusú nemzetközi rend születése (1945-1949). Budapest: Új Mandátum Könyvkiadó, 2001.

Sassen, Saskia: “The State of Globalisation”, in: Interventions. 5:2 (2003), 241-248.

Smith, Neil: “After the American Lebensraum: Empire, Empire and Globalisation”, in: Interventions. 5:2 (2003), 249-270.

Winkler, Allan M.: The Cold War. A History in Documents. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000.

 

Suggested reading list

Cora Zoltán: Az 1945-ös szovjet atomkérdés dokumentumok tükrében. Szeged: JATEPress, 2005.

––––––––– : Soviet Nuclear Espionage in the USA in World War II: The Case of Oppenheimer and Bohr. Americana: E-Journal of American Studies in Hungary 10 (2) (Fall 2014). [article and source publication] URL: http://americanaejournal.hu/vol10no2/cora (access: 01.09.2015)

Lukacs, John: A History of the Cold War. New York: Doubleday, 1962.

Lukacs, John: Through the History of the Cold War: the Correspondence of George F. Kennan and John Lukacs. [A történelem eleven valósága: Gerge F. Kennan és John Lukacs levelezése. Szerk. John Lukacs, ford. M. Nagy Miklós. Budapest: Európa, 2010.]

Johnson, Paul: A History of the American People. New York: HarperPerennial, 1999, 727-976.